My cPanel has a text editor that allows multi-cursor functionality using Ctrl-Alt-Up, Ctrl-Alt-Down, Ctrl-Alt-Right, and Ctrl-Alt-Left. Unfortunately, Windows has default hotkeys for these key combinations that rotate the display on your screen. When I try to use these key combinations in the text editor, Windows hijacks them before they can get to the active window.

I first searched to see if there's any reasonably easy way to turn off specific Windows default hotkeys. My search only turned up results that turn off all hotkeys. I then decided to download AutoHotKeys and see if I could write a script to achieve what I was looking to do. Below are some examples; I'll stick with Ctrl-Alt-Right just to select one out of the four:

First block of code is the same in all 4 attempts:

#NoEnv
SendMode Input
SetWorkingDir %A_ScriptDir%
SetTitleMatchMode, 2      ;this and the next line should only perform the scripted
#IfWinActive Opera        ;hotkey if the active window's title contains 'Opera'

Attempt 1: Hotkey correctly bypasses Windows default display-rotating action, and sends the keystrokes to the text editor in Opera. However, the text editor enters the string "ight" wherever the cursor is. There is no Ctrl-Alt-R hotkey in the text editor, and it must not be a Windows default hotkey either. So it sends Ctrl-Alt-R to Opera, which does nothing. Then it sends "ight" which is typed out. (This is the "most successful" of the 4 attempts, but definitely does not achieve the desired outcome):

^!Right::
Send, ^!Right
return

Attempt 2: Only differs from #1 with SendPlay instead of Send. The Hotkey again correctly bypasses Windows default display-rotating action. However, the text editor does not appear to do anything at all:

^!Right::
SendPlay, ^!Right
return

Attempt 3: Back to just Send, but now with curly braces around the second "Right". Now the hotkey doesn't even bypass Windows default display-rotating action (this truly boggles my mind because I would have thought that the result of Attempt #1 proves that the active Opera window was found and the keystroke Ctrl-Alt-Right is correctly being read by the ^!Right in the first line. I'm so confused why adding the curly braces in the 2nd line is negating these things that seem as if they should already have occurred):

^!Right::
Send, ^!{Right}
return

Attempt 4: Only differs from #3 with SendPlay instead of Send. The Hotkey again correctly bypasses Windows default display-rotating action. However, the text editor does not appear to do anything at all:

^!Right::
SendPlay, ^!{Right}
return

To summarize:

----------|  Curly Braces    |       No Curly Braces       |
----------|------------------|-----------------------------|
Send      | Win Dflt Action  | types "ight" in text editor |
SendPlay  |   no action      |        no action            |

So here's the final question, based on this table, it would appear to me that Send is definitely the way to go. If (as Attempt 3 appears to indicate) the curly brace is causing the display-rotation, how do I send this keystroke to the active window without Windows hijacking it? Obviously, #IfWinActive Opera is working correctly when the curly braces aren't used. Perhaps there is another directive that prevents or bypasses Windows' default action entirely?

1 Answers

1
Evan Elrod On Best Solutions

If you don't wish to have the screen rotation functionality, this can be disabled in your graphics panel. I believe it's associated with Intel graphics application. It might be something like, right-click the desktop, select graphics options, choose hotkeys, then click disable. This is just guessing as I don't have that on the computer I'm using, but I've encountered it on others' computers before.

As for your hotkeys, you need the curly braces around the word "right" or it will just send the individual characters, just like actually typing it. Another issue is that you need a $ in front of your hotkey since it is self-referencing; that is, it's sending the same keystrokes that activate it.

If you haven't had a chance to check out the help file, I definitely recommend it. https://www.autohotkey.com/docs/AutoHotkey.htm